Maryland & Howard County Regulations

Revised Beekeeping Legislation CB 55-2010

Wonderful News For Howard County Beekeepers

On February 7, 2011, The Howard County Council unanimously voted Monday night to change the county zoning law to allow beehives at reduced setbacks under certain conditions.

The revisions are available at CB 55-2010.

Thank you for all your help: Chairperson, Calvin Ball; Vice Chair, Jen Terrasa; Council Member, Mary Kay Sigaty; Council Member, Greg Fox; and Council Member, Courtney Watson.

Visit the Howard County Council

ZRA-117 Zoning Change

Zoning Regulation Amendment (ZRA) to Allow Beekeeping in Howard County

ZRA-117 to amend the Supplementary Zoning Regulations Section of the Zoning Ordinance to allow apiaries to be located within 25 ft of a property line and at least 10 ft with a flight path (barrier) 6 ft high.

Regulations found in other municipalities tends to support these findings. (See support data)

Government Report (Inquiry Into Beekeeping In Urban Areas - August 2000)

Howard County Zoning Regulations

For Howard County Regulations see: Howard County Zoning Regulations, October 6, 2013

See Section 128.O. Apiaries [Council Bill 55-2010 (ZRA-117)] (page 360 of the PDF) 

(Note: Please check the Howard County Regulations for any updates.  The following is an excerpt from those Regulations as of 2013)

N. Apiaries
1. Apiaries are permitted as an accessory use on lots containing community gardens, sites where apiaries will form part of an educational program, and on single-family residential lots; and
361
2. An apiary that is a permitted accessory use under this Subsection shall meet the following requirements:
a. The minimum side and rear setbacks are 25 feet from the lot line, except that the minimum setbacks are 10 feet if the apiary is located as to direct the entrances away from neighboring properties and located:
(1) At least 6 feet above the ground; or
(2) Behind a solid fence, hedge, or other barrier that is at least 6 feet in height and runs parallel to the property line, and extends 10 feet beyond the apiary in each direction.
b. Bee flyways shall be at least 6 feet above any deck or other open outdoor structure that is located on an adjoining property within 25 feet of the apiary;
c. The minimum front setback is 50 feet from the front lot line;
d. A water supply shall be provided to minimize honeybees from seeking water off-site; and
e. Apiaries shall comply with Maryland Department of Agriculture Regulations as they pertain to beekeeping, and be operated and maintained in accordance with Best Management Practices; and
3. An apiary use may not unreasonably interfere with the proper enjoyment of the property of others, with the comfort of the public, or with the use of any public right-of-way.

ZRA-117 - Howard County Planning Board's Recommendations

Zoning Regulation Amendment (ZRA) to Allow Beekeeping in Howard County

The recommendations made by the Howard County Planning Board is attached.

Motion: to recommend denial of the petitioner's proposal as written and subsequent language modification. To make recommendations which permit Apiary use under specific conditions.

Action: Recommended denial of petition as written and to make recommendations; Vote 4 to 0

Recommendation

ZRA-117 to amend the Supplementary Zoning Regulations Section of the Zoning Ordinance to allow apiaries to be located within 25 ft of a property line and at least 10 ft with a flight path (barrier) 6 ft high.

Regulations found in other municipalities tends to support these findings. (See support data)

Government Report (Inquiry Into Beekeeping In Urban Areas - August 2000)

Maryland Standard of Identity for Honey

Maryland Standard of Identity for Honey

SENATE BILL 193

MSBA Tee shirt sale

MSBA Tee

MSBA is selling Tee Shirts.  Additional information on purchasing, please go to the MSBA (website)

 

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Queen's Contrivance.

The purpose of this website is to promote honey beekeeping by providing a forum in which current honey beekeepers may become more knowledgeable of best practices and the public can become more, and accurately, informed on the benefits of honey bees. For more info or comments, contact Jeff Crooks at jlcrooks@live.com